XXe Colloque de L’Académie Internationale d’Héraldique

Les grands ordres de chevalerie et leurs traditions héraldiques

XX. Colloquium of the International Academy of Heraldry

The great orders of chivalry and their heraldic traditions

Christian VIII's Palace, Amalienborg, Copenhagen, 10.-13. November 2017

Patron: H.R.H. Prince Joachim of Denmark, Chancellor of the Danish Royal Orders

The “Knights’ Hall”, Rosenborg Castle.

The XX. Colloquium of A.I.H. will take place  in Copenhagen at Christian VIII’s Palace, Amalienborg, with the theme “The Great Orders of Chivalry and their Heraldic Traditions”, and under the patronage of H.R.H. Prince Joachim of Denmark, Chancellor of the Danish Royal Orders.

The dates are 10.–13. November 2017, including a half-day excursion on the 13.  The full programme is on-line, as well as abstracts of the lectures to be given.

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Private visit and reception at Rosenborg Castle

As part of the colloquium a private tour of Rosenborg Castle, including the Crown Jewels/Regalia and Royal Orders and a special exhibition of robes of the Danish Royal Orders will be arranged for the opening afternoon (the 10th), including a reception at the “Knights’ Hall” at Rosenborg Castle.

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Excursion to Frederiksborg Castle

On Monday 13. November there will be an excursion to the Chapel of the Danish Royal Orders at Frederiksborg Castle, Hillerød, including a tour of the castle.

The Chapel of the Danish Royal Orders at Frederiksborg Castle, Hillerød, featuring armorial “stall plates” of  the Knights of the Order of the Elephant and the Knights Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog.

A more than 300 years old – and still living – tradition of displaying the armorial plates of Knights of the Order of the Elephant and Knights Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog in the Chapel of the Royal Orders has resulted in an impressive collection of heraldry.

An introduction to the chapel and the armorial plates will be given by Ronny Andersen (Royal Herald Painter).

Participation in the excursion (including bus and lunch) will cost 50 Euro for each person (and is not included in the colloquium participation fee).

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Participation/Registration/Payment

Participation costs 150 Euro; accompanying persons are free of charge but will not be able to participate in the colloquium itself unless they register for participation and pay the full fee. The colloquium dinner costs 75 Euro for each person.

Deadline for registration as participant(s) is 1. September. To register for participation, please go here.

Payment on 1. September 2017 at the latest, either via Paypal: pay@heraldik.org or through bank transfer to: Dansk Heraldisk Selskab, Tesdorpfsvej 59, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.

  • For persons with a Danish bank account: Danske Bank, account no: 1551-3719354025
  • For payments from outside Denmark: BIC: DABADKKK ; IBAN: DK5930003719354025

Armorial “stall plate” at Frederiksborg Castle with coat-of-arms for H.R.H. Princess Marie of Denmark (née Cavallier), as member of the Order of the Elephant.

Paper presentations should be restricted to 30 minutes in length to allow for questions and must be given in English, French or German. It is required that papers are illustrated with a PowerPoint demonstration and that the manuscripts will be submitted to the organizers (kurrild-klitgaard@heraldik.org) for publication in the colloquium proceedings.

Among the confirmed speakers/topics are (per July 2017):

 

  1. Ronny Andersen (Chapter of the Danish Royal Orders / Danish National Archives): “The Danish Royal Orders of the Elephant and the Dannebrog: Their Armorials and Traditions”. In the statutes of both the Order of the Elephant and the Order of Dannebrog, knights were ordered to deliver a coloured image of their coat of arms for inclusion in the ar­mo­ri­als of the orders and for painting on an armorial plate for the Chapel of the Orders in the church of Frederiksborg Castle. Both traditions still exist. The chapel was established in 1693-94 and the armorials of the two orders were created some years earlier. A heraldic paint­er responsible for painting the coats of arms has been affiliated with the royal orders of knighthood since that time. This lecture will give a survey of the armorial traditions of the Danish royal orders, the rich heraldic content of the armorials and the heraldic painters.
  2. Richard C.F. Baker (Institute for Heraldic and Genealogical Studies): “The Chivalric Stall Plates in London: The Order of the Bath, The Order of the British Empire, The Order of St Michael & St George, The Royal Victorian Order and the Knights Bachelor”. This paper presents an overview of the chivalric stall-plates and traditions of those English orders of chivalry, the chapels of which are located in London. The chapel of the Order of the Bath is in Westminster Abbey, that of the Royal Victorian Order at the Chapel Royal of the Savoy, and those of the Order of St Michael & St George, the Order of the British Empire, and the Knights Bachelor in St Paul’s Cathedral.
  3. Tom Bergroth (Chancery of the Swedish Royal Orders): “The Iconography of the Chivalric Stall Plates in Stockholm: The Order of the Seraphim and The Order of Charles XIII”. With the institution of the Order of the Seraphim in 1748 it was settled that a knight/member also should have a stall plate. The idea originates from the stall plates created in 1693 for the Danish orders of knighthood. It was initiated by count Carl Gustaf Tessin, who on his journey home from Paris to Stockholm in 1743 had seen the stall plates of the Order of the Golden Fleece in Brügge and Gent. The Swedish stall plates came to be modelled after them. In the case of the Order of Charles XIII, instituted in 1811, the oval shaped form for the Bååth Palace in Stockholm were modelled after the form of the coat of arms for members of the knight’s degree within the Swedish Orders of Freemasons since the late 1770’s.
  4. Claire Boudreau/Robert D. Watt (L’Autorité héraldique du Canada / Canadian Heraldic Au­thority): “Les Ordres Nationaux et Provinciaux du Canada et leurs Traditions Héraldiques / The National and Provincial Orders of Canada and their Relation to Heraldry”. A young country in the Commonwealth, Canada does not have a great order of chivalry similar to such great Orders in Europe. The Order of Canada, which is the centrepiece of our national ho­nour system, celebrates the 50th anniversary of its creation this year. Since 1967, two other national orders and several provincial orders have been established. The heraldic traditions associated with these Orders, still recent, first include the design of the ho­nou­ra­ble insignia, largely inspired by arms or official flags. These traditions also include the pos­sibility of granting supporters to certain individuals, the addition of annulus encircling the shield inscribed with the motto of the Order for others, and the display of insignia be­neath the shield of arms granted by the Chief Herald of Canada. During this pre­sen­ta­tion we will showcase the work that lead to the creation of these traditions and highlight key moments of this development in our young history.  / Jeune pays du Com­mon­wealth, le Canada n’a pas de grand ordre de chevalerie similaire aux grands ordres eu­ro­péens. L’Ordre du Canada, qui est l’élément phare du Régime des distinctions honorifiques de notre pays, célèbre son 50e anniversaire cette année. Depuis 1967, deux autres ordres nationaux et plusieurs ordres provinciaux ont été créés. Les traditions héraldiques de ces ordres, encore récentes, incluent tout d’abord le dessin des insignes honorifiques, en majorité inspirés des armoiries et/ou drapeaux officiels. Elles incluent également la possibilité de se voir concéder des supports pour quelques-uns des récipiendaires, d’ajouter des anneaux inscrits de la devise des Ordres nationaux autour de l’écu pour d’autres, et de suspendre les insignes des distinctions honorifiques sous l’écu d’armoiries concédées par le héraut d’armes du Canada. Au cours de cette conférence, nous présenterons le travail ayant mené à la création de ces traditions et mettrons en évidence quelques moment clé de notre jeune histoire.
  5. D’Arcy Boulton (University of Notre Dame / University of Toronto): “The Early Evo­lu­tion of the Practice of Associating the Insignia of Monarchical Orders of Knighthood with the Personal Arms of their Members, 1348-1519”. The practice of associating the insignia of curial orders with the arms of their members began among the knights of the Garter shortly after its foundation in 1349, but did not become normal in that order until about 1419. After 1359, however, a similar practice was adopted by at least some members of most later orders whose insignia took a comparable form.  Insignia in the form of a collar of some sort predominated among new orders after 1380, and were normal from 1430, leading to a general association of ordinal insignia with arms in orders founded after that date.  The general practice of associating insignia of any sort with shields of arms began in ecclesiastical circles and that of the French monarchy in the 1290s, but remained sporadic in secular contexts until the years around 1350, and had not involved the insignia of any of the five curial orders founded between 1325 and 1340. From shortly after the foundation of the English Order of the Garter in 1348, however, a few of its members chose to mark their membership by setting its zoniform badge around their arms.  Thereafter a similar practice was adopted by at least some members of most later orders whose insignia took a comparable form, suitable for encircling a shield, but not by the members of most the late-fourteenth-century orders whose badge took a different form. Insignia in the form of a collar of some sort predominated after 1380, and no doubt in consequence the proportion of the members of curial orders displaying their order’s insignia in association with their arms grew fairly steadily from that date. The practice was universal in some orders (notably the Golden Fleece) from 1430, but did not become universal in all until about 1519, when the statutes of the Garter were revised.
  6. Charles J. Burnett: “The Heraldic Practices of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem”. Although the Order of St John in the United Kingdom is a Royal Order of Chivalry with The Queen as Sovereign Head, it is unlike any other British Order. Knights are not “Sir” and ladies are not “Dame”, there are however heraldic privileges.  Some books claim the Order has continuity with the medieval Knights Hospitallers, but this is not the case, and the Order only received Royal Recognition in 1888.  My presentation will trace the origins of the Most Venerable Order, then deal with insignia, Order heraldry throughout the Commonwealth and Territories, how armigerous Members may present their Arms to show the connection with the Order, and finally how heraldry has been used within the Priory of Scotland in particular.  The presentation concludes with the va­rious charitable activities of the Most Venerable Order which echo the second motto of the British Order ‘Pro utilitate hominum’.
  7. Laura Cirri: “The Holy and Military Order of Saint Stephen in the time of the Medici”. The Holy Mi­litary Order of St. Stephen was a religious and military Order founded in 1561 by Co­simo I of the Medici under the approval of the pope Pio IV.  The main aim was to fight the Ottoman Turks.   The Palazzo della Carovana, the seat of the Order in Pisa, as well as the State archive preserve a large number of coats of arms of the knights.   The talk will outline the history and the importance of the cross of the Order in the knights’ em­blems as well their uniforms under the Medici and later under the Habsburg-Lorraine family.
  8. Leticia Darna: L’ordre du Temple dans les anciens territoires de la Couronne d’Aragon et transfert ul­térieur de tous leurs biens à l’ordre de l’hôpital de San Juan de Jérusalem. Empreintes dans l’ar­chi­tec­ture et héraldique siècles XII-XVIII”. Quelques-uns des plus remarquables membres de la Cou­ronne d’Aragon a appartenu à l’ordre. Au fil des siècles, tous ses biens et ses châteaux est devenu l’ordre de San Juan de Jérusalem. A titre d’exemple, un de vous ordonne eux – qui vous avez participé à l’étude de son héraldique-Vallfogona de Riucorb (Tarragone), il a appartenu à la milice du Temple de Salomon, de 1190 jusqu’en 1312. Par la suite à la maison royale d’Aragon, alors qu’il se réfère à la compétence, de 1312 jusqu’en 1357, puis à l’ordre hospitalier de Saint Juan de Jérusalem de 1357 jusqu’en 1811, et enfin en 1812 par la Constitution de la Cortes de Cadix, toutes les administrations nobles d’Espagne ont été incorporées dans la Couronne.  La Couronne d’Aragon c’était véritable témoignage du passage de ces ordres de chevalerie, aussi bien en architecture et en art et héraldique. Est très intéressant analyser l’héraldique d’entre eux Grand maîtres et commandeurs. Notez que certains d’entre eux avaient des postes importants dans le reste de l’Europe, comme Arnau de Torroja, noble Catalan qui était grand-maître de l’ordre des Templiers entre 1180 et 1184. En conclusion, dans la Couronne d’Aragon avaient des ordres de grande importance où les Chevaliers de ces ordres se sont battus et défend leur territoire jusqu’aux ultimes conséquences.
  9. Patric L. Dickinson (College of Arms): “The Stall Plates, Banners and Crests of the Companions of the Order of the Garter in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor”. The armorial accoutrements of the Knights of the Garter provide one of the most colourful and historic displays of heraldry in England.  Enamelled metallic plates displaying the coats of arms of the Companions of the Order are affixed to their stalls in St George’s Chapel, Windsor and remain there in perpetuity.  This remarkable collection of 800 stall plates forms a unique and per­ma­nent record of the arms of the Companions built up over a period of six centuries.  They are complemented by the heraldic banners and carved wooden crests that are placed above the stalls of KGs during their lifetime.
  10. Sonja Dünnebeil: “Die Wappentafeln der Ritter des Or­dens vom Goldenen Vlies: Bedeutung und Be­standsaufnahme”. Der Orden vom Goldenen Vlies ist vor allem durch seine prachtvollen Feste des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts bekannt. Anlässlich des gemeinsamen Besuchs von Gottesdiensten wurden in den Kirchen die Wappentafeln der Mitglieder aufgehängt, um deren Sitzplätze zu kennzeichnen. Mehrere dieser Wappenzyklen haben sich bis in die heutige Zeit hinein erhalten, so z.B. in Brügge, Gent, Mechelen, Den Haag oder Barcelona. In dem Vortrag werden die erhaltenen Wappentafeln vorgestellt und es sollen deren Funktion innerhalb des Zeremoniells und als Mittel der permanenten Repräsentation des Ordens beschrieben werden.
  11. Paul A. Fox: “Coats of arms of Knights of The Or­der of Malta in Malta, Rhodes and Rome”. The long history of the Knights Hospitaller encompasses the entire period of heraldry, but lit­tle survives from the period prior to the order’s expulsion from the Holy Land in 1291. The occupation of Rhodes from 1309 to 1523 was a fruitful period in evolutionary terms, while the very high point of artistic achievement was realised during the subsequent period on Malta. This too came to an end when Napoleon occupied the island in 1798. To complete the story some examples will be shown from the current headquarters in Rome where the order has been based since 1830.
  12. Michael Göbl (Österreichisches Staatsarchiv): “Die Ritterwappen in der Wiener Deutschordenskirche”. Das Referat wird sich mit den 84 Ritterwappen, die im Kirchenschiff des Deutschen Ordens in Wien angebracht sind, beschäftigen. Es sollen die einzelnen Per­sonen systematisch untersucht werden, ihre Bedeutung und wie sie ihren Schild ge­stal­tet haben. Es sollen heraldische Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede herausgearbeitet werden.
  13. Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard (University of Copenhagen): “The Heraldic Traditions of the Knights of the Or­der of St. John (Balley Brandenburg) and the Church of the Order in Sonnenburg”. With the Treaty of Heimbach (1382) the Bailiwick of Brandenburg became an autonomous part of the Order of Knights Hospitaller, called of Saint John, later of Malta.  With the Re­for­mation the Bailiwick turned Protestant and from the Westphalian Peace it was for­mal­ly under the protection of the Margraves of Brandenburg, although it maintained a loose affiliation with the Order of Malta and until 1810/12 was still known as the “Jo­han­niter-Malteserorden”.  With its independence the Bailiwick gradually developed its own heraldic traditions, first and foremost visible at the Order’s Church at Schloss Son­nen­burg (now Słońsk in Poland), which was the Order’s seat 1662-1945, and which housed a magnificent collection of plates with the arms of the knights.  After the loss of the property to Poland, the collection was stolen and auctioned off.   The lecture iden­ti­fies the development and content of the Order’s heraldic rules of marshalling, etc., and illustrates with examples.
  14. Rolf Kälin: Die Wappen der Damen und Ritter der Schweizerischen Statthalterei des Ritterordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem im Chorherrenstift Beromünster”. Das Chorherrenstift Beromünster besitzt eine seit alters her blühende Wappentradition. Schon der Minnesänger und Heiliggrabritter Hesso von R[e]inach (1234 – ca. 1276), Chorherr des Stiftes, fand hier seine letzte Ruhestätte. 1947 wurde diese alte Wappentradition mit der Gründung der Schweizerischen Statthalterei des Ritterordens vom Hl. Grab zu Jerusalem wieder aufgenommen und 1952 liess der Orden im Kreuzgang einen prachtvollen Wappenfries anlegen. Im Zuge der Gesamtrenovation des Kreuzgangs 1985 wurde der Wappenfries jedoch aus umstrittenen Gründen übertüncht und es mussten etwas abseits neue Wappentafeln mit den Wappen der Damen und Ritter des Ordens angebracht werden. Themenschwerpunkte bilden der „verlorene“ Fries und das seit 1966 geführte Wappenbuch des Ordens.
  15. Michel Popoff: “‘L’ordre et Aimable Compagnie de Monsieur Saint Michel’: Gran­deur, Décadence et Résurrection d’un Ordre Royal Créé dans la Tourmente”. L’ordre de Saint-Michel est fondé le 1er août 1469 par Louis XI, sous le nom d’« Ordre et aimable compagnie de monsieur saint Michel » en réplique à celui de l’ordre de la Toison d’or, dont il copiait les statuts. Le roi le dirigeait et les chevaliers, au nombre de trente-six, lui prêtaient serment. Cela permettait au roi de se créer un réseau de fidélités qui n’étaient plus liées aux fidélités féodales. Les chevaliers portaient, « un collier d’or fait de coquilles lassées, l’une avec l’autre, d’un double las» auquel était suspendu un médaillon représentant l’archange terrassant le dragon.
  16. Elizabeth Roads (Court of Lord Lyon): “The Heraldic Traditions and Chapel of the Order of the Thistle”. The Order of the Thistle was without a spiritual home from its revival in 1687 to the completion in 1910 of the Thistle Chapel attached to St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh.  The Chapel is small but a gem of the Arts and Crafts Movement of early 20th century Scotland.  It is highly adored with heraldry ranging from stall-plates and crests to heraldic stained glass, stone and woodwork.  The paper will look at the various ways in which heraldry associated with the Order has been used to beautify this Chapel whilst also commenting on some much older heraldic uses.
  17. Peter Rätzel: “Die Ritterwappen in der Kapelle des Schwanenordens in der St. Gumbertskirche in Ansbach”. 1445 verleiht König Sigmund auf dem Konzil zu Konstanz Burggraf Friedrich VI. von Nürnberg die Würden eines Markgrafen und Kurfürsten von Brandenburg.  Die feier­liche Zeremonie findet zwei Jahre später statt. Sein Sohn stiftet in der Folge 1443 die ”Gesellschaft unserer lieben Frauen”. Sie soll zur Hebung von Frieden und Sitten in Bran­denburg beitragen. Die Madonna und der Schwan sind Ordenszeichen. Es wird der Frage nachgegangen, ob zwischen dem Schwanenorden und dem dänischen Ele­fant­en­orden infolge der Heirat König Christians I. mit Dorothea, Tochter Markgrafs Johannes von Brandenburg-Kulmbach ein Zusammenhang besteht.
  18. Georg Scheibelreiter (Universität Wien): “Drachenorden Kaiser Sigismunds und die habs­bur­gi­schen Hoforden”. Sigismund, König von Ungarn, dann auch römisch-deutscher Kaiser, schloss sich der gesellschaftlichen Mode an und gründete 1408 den Drachenorden, wobei er der luxemburgischen Ordenstradition ebenso folgte wie den politischen Tendenzen seiner Zeit. Der Adel des Landes sollte durch diese Mitgliedschaft auf den König aus­ge­richtet und ihm zu besonderer Treue verpflichtet werden. Obwohl der Orden in der Burg zu Buda seinen Sitz hatte, wurden jedoch bald auch Sigismund fernerstehende und aus­wär­tige Fürsten mit dem neuen Orden ausgezeichnet. Die Versuche der Habsburger im 14. und 15. Jahrhundert durch Ordensgründungen Ansehen und politische Bedeutung zu gewinnen, scheiterten jedoch. Herzog Otto der Fröhliche, sein Neffe Albrecht III. und später noch Kaiser Friedrich III. stifteten Hoforden, die keine nachhaltige Wirkung er­reichten und meist nach dem Tode ihrer Gründer wieder verschwanden. Erst die Hei­rat Erzherzog Maximilians mit Maria von Burgund 1479 ermöglichte die Bindung des hoch­angesehenen Ordens vom Goldenen Vlies an die Habsburger.
  19. Herbert Stoyan: “Die Wappen der Mitglieder des jülich-bergischen St. Hubertus-Ordens”. The St. Hu­bertus Order was founded by Herzog Gerhard v. Jülich in 1444 after the successful battle of Linnich. His son Wilhelm took over and refounded the order 1476. Later, when Jülich and Berg was part of the Kurpfalz and went to Bavaria the order was inherited by the latter. The Bavarian king used the order as the Bavarian top house order.  Because of the confuse beginning not everything is clear in the first century of the existence of the order. There are at least three main sources: Leist published 1892 a list of knights together with their coats of arms (the so-called Bruderschaftsbuch). A French source (Appendice sur l’ordre de Saint-Hubert) gives verbal blasons and some names. In 1585 many of the knights visited the Jülich Marriage and are listed with their four parents’ coats of arms in the related book. Das Heroldsbuch of the order is saved but was not recognized before WW II. At the end of WWII it was moved to Kraków and still lacks heraldic analysis. The problem with this source is that its pages are in complete disorder. Keys are still: the hand­writing of the heralds, the four parts of the paper pages because of object coherence, and the heraldic content. We follow Countess of Nesselrode in her proposal of the early knights of the order and add some own analysis. Some interesting coats of arms are shown.
  20. Rolf Sutter (Pro Heraldica): “Der Königliche Haus-Ritterorden vom Heiligen Georg”.  Um die Entstehung des Königlichen Haus-Ritterorden vom Heiligen Georg ranken sich Mythen und Legenden. Worauf also kann er sich gründen – der „Privat-Orden des Hauses Wittelsbach“? Etwa auf die Betätigungsbulle eines Papstes im 18. Jahrhundert?  Die Frage muss offen bleiben.  Viel wichtiger ist: Wann wird der Haus-Ritterorden des Hauses Wittelsbach „legendenfrei“ fassbar, wie konstituiert er sich, nach welchen Statuten arbeitet er, und wie stellt er sich heute dar.  Wie sind die Wappen der Ordensritter mit dem Ordenswappen „kombiniert“, wie und wo werden sie präsentiert und wie lange?  Nachdem das alte Archiv des Ordens beim Brand der Münchner 1570 fast gänzlich vernichtet wurde, müssen wir uns auf mühsame Spurensuche begeben.  Wohin uns das führt, wollen wir sehen.
  21. Pier Felice degli Uberti (Istituto Araldico Genealogico Italiano): “The Shields of the Knights of The Con­stantinian Order of St. George (‘Sacro Angelico Imperiale Ordine Costantiniano di S. Giorgio’) in the Basilica di Santa Maria della Steccata in Parma”. The Shrine of Santa Maria della Steccata in Parma, Italy, built between 1521 and 1539 was, since 1718 by order of Pope Clement XI, the headquarters of the Constantinian Order of Saint George, whose great Magisterium was transferred, in 1699, by Andrea Flavio Comneno, to the House of the Farnese. In 1823, Marie Louise of Austria commissioned a crypt to preserve the tombs of the Dukes and Princes of the House of Farnese and of the Bourbon – Parma. From this crypt, we can proceed to the precious Gallery of the Coats of Arms which preserves the shields of the Constantinian Knights, appointed directly by Marie Louise, who was the Great Master of the Order between 1816 and 1847.  The Church is part of the heritage of the Constantinian Order (Moral Entity of the Italian Republic).

Prelimary programme (per July 2017)

(NB! Time schedule subject to changes in case of cancellations, etc.)

 

Friday the 10th of November 2017

 

09.00          Registration at Christian VIII’s Palace, Amalienborg.

10.00          Formal opening at Christian VIII’s Palace, Amalienborg [participants should be seated at 09.45.]

  • Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard, President of Dansk Heraldisk Selskab & of Socie­tas Heraldica Scandinavica.
  • Robert D. Watt, President of Académie Internationale d’Héraldique.
  • H.R.H. Prince Joachim of Denmark, Chancellor of the Danish Royal Orders.

10.20         D’Arcy Boulton: “The Early Evolution of the Practice of Associating the Insignia of Mo­narchical Orders of Knighthood with the Personal Arms of their Members, 1348-1519”.

11.00          Leticia Darna: L’ordre du Temple dans les anciens territoires de la Couronne d’Aragon et transfert ultérieur de tous leurs biens à l’ordre de l’hôpital de San Juan de Jérusalem. Em­prein­tes dans l’architecture et héraldique siècles XII-XVIII”.

11.40          Lunch break*

13.10         Sonja Dünnebeil: “Die Wappentafeln der Ritter des Or­dens vom Goldenen Vlies: Be­deu­tung und Bestandsaufnahme”.

13.50          Georg Scheibelreiter: “Drachenorden Kaiser Sigismunds und die habsburgischen Hoforden”.

14.30          Coffee

14.50          Ronny Andersen: “The Danish Royal Orders of the Elephant and the Dannebrog: Their Armorials and Traditions”.

15.30          End; departure for Rosenborg Castle (by foot or car)

 

16.00-18.00 Private visit for colloquium participants to Rosenborg Castle:

  • Reception at the “Knights’ Hall” and special exhibition of knightly robes of the Danish Royal Orders.
  • Welcome / Jørgen Selmer, Director, The Danish Royal Collection.
  • Tour, including Crown Jewels and Royal Orders / Peter Kristiansen, Curator, The Danish Royal Collection. 

 

Saturday the 11th of November 2017

 

09.00          Peter Rätzel: “Die Ritterwappen in der Kapelle des Schwanenordens in der St. Gum­berts­kirche in Ansbach”.

09.40          Herbert Stoyan: “Die Wappen der Mitglieder des jülich-bergischen St. Hubertus-Ordens”.

10.20           Coffee

10.40          Patric Dickinson: “The Stall Plates, Banners and Crests of the Companions of the Or­der of the Garter in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor”.

11.20          Elizabeth Roads: “The Heraldic Traditions and Chapel of the Order of the Thistle”.

12.00         Lunch break*

13.30          Richard C.F. Baker: “The Chivalric Stall Plates in London: The Order of the Bath, The Order of the British Empire, The Order of St Michael & St George, The Royal Vic­to­ri­an Order and the Knights Bachelor”.

14.10          Paul A. Fox: “Coats of arms of Knights of The Or­der of Malta in Malta, Rhodes and Rome”.

14.50          Coffee

15.10          Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard: “The Heraldic Traditions of the Knights of the Or­der of St. John (Balley Brandenburg) and the Church of the Order in Sonnenburg”.

15.50          Charles J. Burnett: “The Heraldic Practices of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem”.

16.30          End

 

16.30-17.30 General Assembly, Académie Internationale d’Héraldique (The International Academy of Heraldry)

 

19.30          Dinner, House of “Finans Danmark” (Danish Bankers’ Association), Amaliegade 7, Copenhagen.

 

Sunday the 12th of November 2017

 

09.00          Laura Cirri: “The Holy and Military Order of Saint Stephen in the time of the Medici”.

09.40          Pier Felice degli Uberti: “The Shields of the Knights of The Con­stantinian Order of St. George (‘Sacro An­gelico Imperiale Ordine Costantiniano di S. Giorgio’) in the Basilica di San­ta Maria della Steccata in Parma”.

10.20          Coffee

10.40          Michel Popoff: “‘L’ordre et Aimable Compagnie de Monsieur Saint Michel’: Gran­deur, Déc­adence et Résurrection d’un Ordre Royal Créé dans la Tourmente”.

11.20          Tom Bergroth: “The Iconography of the Chivalric Stall Plates in Stockholm: The Order of the Seraphim and The Order of Charles XIII”.

12.00          Lunch break*

13.30          Rolf Kälin: “Die Wappen der Damen und Ritter der Schweizerischen Statthalterei des Rit­terordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem im Chorherrenstift Beromünster”.

14.10          Michael Göbl: “Die Ritterwappen in der Wiener Deutschordenskirche”.

14.50          Coffee

15.10          Rolf Sutter: “Der Königliche Haus-Ritterorden vom Heiligen Georg”.

15.40          Claire Boudreau/Robert D. Watt: “Les Ordres Nationaux et Provinciaux du Ca­nada et leurs Tra­di­tions Héraldiques / The National and Provincial Orders of Canada and their Relation to Heraldry”.

16.30          Formal closing

Nils G. Bartholdy, 1st Vice President, Académie Internationale d’Héraldique

 

Monday the 13th of November 2017

 

09.00          Departure by bus from Det Gule Palæ (Amalienborg), Amaliegade 18, Co­pen­hagen, for Frederiksborg Castle, Hillerød.

10.00

  • Welcome & introduction / Director Mette Skougaard, Museum of National History at Frederiksborg Castle.
  • Tour of the Chapel of the Danish Royal Orders / Royal Herald Painter Ronny Andersen, Chapter of the Royal Orders.
  • Tour (unguided) of Frederiksborg Castle.

13.00         Lunch at ”Spisestedet Leonora”.

15.00         Departure from Frederiksborg Castle by bus.

16.00         Arrival, Det Gule Palæ (Amalienborg), Amaliegade 18, Copenhagen.

 

* No joint lunch is organized.  Participants are responsible for making their own arran­ge­ments.

NUMBER OF PERSONS

 

Some selected/recommended restaurants in the vicinity of Amalienborg

The neighbourhood surrounding Amalienborg—called “Frederiksstaden” [Frederik’s City]—was primarily built from the late-17th to 19th centuries and is probably the most exclusive in Copenhagen.  This is reflected in both quality and prices.   The following is a short, selected guide of restaurants within walking distance.  Reservations are highly recommended.

Restaurant name Type of food Price Address Opening hours/days Meters from Amalienborg
Restaurant Amalie *** Traditional Danish (lunch) £££ Amaliegade 11, 1256 Copenhagen K 11.30-16.00 (but closed Sun.) 170
Mormors * Sandwiches (lunch) £ Bredgade 45, 1260 Copenhagen K 10.00-17.00 225
Café Oscar * Café food (pastas, homemade burgers, etc.) ££ Bredgade 58, 1260 Copenhagen K 10.00-22.00 250
Le Sommelier **** Classic French £££ Bredgade 63, 1260 Copenhagen K 12.00-14.00 (but closed Sat./Sun.); 18.00-22.00 350
Salt **** Modern French (lunch; dinner) £££££ Hotel Admiral, Toldbodgade 24-28, 1253 Copenhagen K 12.00-16.00 / 17.00-22.30 350
Restaurant Sankt Annæ *** Traditional Danish (lunch) £££ Sankt Annæ Plads 12, 1250 Copenhagen K 11.00-14.00 (but closed Sun.) 350
Restaurant Ida Davidsen *** Modern interpretations of traditional Danish “smørrebrød” (lunch) £££ 10.30-17.00 (but closed Sat.-Sun.) 450
Café Petersborg *** Traditional Danish (lunch; dinner) £££ Bredgade 76, 1260 Copenhagen K 11.45-16.00; 17.00-21.00 (but closed Sun.) 500
M.A.S.H. **** Steaks (lunch; dinner) ££££ Bredgade 20, 1260 Copenhagen K 12.00-15.00 (but closed Sat./Sun.)/ 17.30-23.00 550
Lumskebugten *** Traditional Danish (lunch; dinner) £££ Esplanaden 21, 1263 Copenhagen K 11.30 -15.00 / 18.00-21.30 (but closed Sun.) 600
Hereford Steakhouse ** Steaks (lunch; dinner) £££ Store Kongensgade 38, 1264 Copenhagen K 12.00-23.00 600
Orangeriet *** French/interna­tional or tra­ditional Danish “smørrebrød” £££ Kronprinsessegade  13, 1306 Copenhagen K 11.30-15.00 but 12.00-16.00 Sun. /18.00-22.00 (Wed.-Sat.) 900
Pastis *** French bistro (lunch; dinner) £££ Gothersgade 52, 1123 Copenhagen K 11.30-15.00 / 17.30-22.30 1.000

There are many more restaurants within walking distance.  More affordable restaurants may be found further away.

As a rule of thumb tourists should be aware that restaurants on the main pedestrian street of Copenhagen (“Strøget”) or on “Sunny Side” of the old harbor, “Nyhavn”, tend to be geared much towards tourists.

Hotel name Price Address Meters from Amalienborg
Hotel Admiral **** ££££ Toldbodgade 24-28, DK-1253 Copenhagen K 400
Hotel Phoenix **** ££££ Bredgade 37, DK-1260 Copenhagen K 400
Hotel Front Scandic **** ££££ Sankt Annæ Plads 21, DK-1250 Copenhagen K 450
Hotel Skt. Annæ **** ££££ Sankt Annæ Plads 18-20, DK-1250 Copenhagen K 500
Hotel Guldsmeden Babette *** £££ Bredgade 78, DK-1260 Copenhagen K 500
Hotel Christian IV *** £££ Dronningens Tværgade 45, DK-1302 Copenhagen K 800
Hotel Wake-up ** ££ Borgergade 9, DK-1300 Copenhagen K 850
Hotel D’Angle­terre ***** £££££ Kongens Nytorv 34, DK-1050 Copenhagen K 900

Copenhagen has many hotels—but they also tend to be relatively expensive.  The hotels centrally located in the inner city are among the most expensive.  More affordable accommodations may be found, e.g., in the areas near the central station.

Previous AIH Colloquia:

Organizational websites:

Colloquium sites in Copenhagen:

  • Amalienborg (Royal residence, venue of the colloquium itself)
  • Rosenborg Castle (Royal collections, venue of reception and exhibition)
  • Frederiksborg Castle (Museum of National History, including Chapel of Royal Orders, venue of excursion)

Contact:

Organizing Committee:

  • Prof. Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard, AIH (President, Danish Heraldry Society & Scandinavian Heraldry Society)
  • Ronny Andersen, AIH, Royal Herald Painter, Archivist & Heraldic Consultant
  • Nils G. Bartholdy, AIH, fmr. Archivist & Heraldic Consultant

assisted by:

  • Niels Arne Dam, Ph.D. (Treasurer, Danish Heraldry Society & Scandinavian Heraldry Society)
  • Peter Kristiansen, Curator (The Danish Royal Collections/Rosenborg Castle)

 

Organizations: